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SideNote: “The Wes Anderson Collection” author Matthew Soller Seitz analyzes “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

SideNote: “The Wes Anderson Collection” author Matthew Soller Seitz analyzes “The Grand Budapest Hotel.”

I grabbed a copy around Christmas 2013 of Matthew Soller Seitz’s “The Wes Anderson Collection” and it is easily one of the greatest coffee table books I have ever purchased.

Being a huge fan of Wes Anderson’s films I have followed all of Seitz’s promotional videos that spend 10-15 minutes analyzing the works of Wes Anderson. This analysis of “The Grand Budapest Hotel” can be perspective-shifting to those who weren’t originally converted by the films charm and wit.

As another sidenote, dear God the production design in this film is perfect. Absolutely perfect. You don’t have to be a Wes Anderson fan, but just a fan of cinema, to admire “The Grand Budapest Hotel” as an aesthetically strong film.

You can grab Matthew Soller Seitz’s new book “The Wes Anderson Collection: The Grand Budapest Hotel” here.

SideNote: Managing Expectations

interstellar_aSideNote: Managing Expectations

The most peculiar thing about “Interstellar” coming out hasn’t been its lukewarm 73% on Rotten Tomatoes or that it came up short to “Big Hero 6” in the box office over it’s opening weekend, it’s the apologetic reaction from fans of director Christopher Nolan, most of which defended the film even before its release.

“Interstellar” isn’t the first movie to fall victim to hype. But its worth discussing how a person’s reaction to the film is almost set in stone before they even see it. I have always liked Nolan’s films, but since I’m trying to offer an objective opinion on a blog I try to clear my mind of any good, or bad, expectations before watching a film. The same goes for games and television shows.

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Top 10: Most Complex Wes Anderson Characters

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Top 10: Most Complex Wes Anderson Characters

Wes Anderson has directed seven films in his career. Of those films he has also written them (most of the time with a co-writer). All seven of these films have similar things in common, from their symmetrical shots to their color palettes. A common theme in a Wes Anderson film is dysfunctional characters.

Each character is layered in a way that they are suffering from some case of minor mental illness. Characters experience neurotic and unconventional behavior through these illnesses which can consist of bipolar disorder, depression, and a variety of social disorders. I am no psychiatrist, so I couldn’t simply tell you a diagnoses of each characters illness.

This illness within the main protagonists doesn’t mean we will find ourselves immersed in drama. Wes Anderson films are comedies and explore quirkiness around the manner of these illnesses. The more in-depth the illness is the more complex the character is. So without further ado, here is The Media 10’s Top 10 list for the most complex Wes Anderson characters: (more…)